Debates of the Senate  
3rd Session, 40th Parliament,Volume 147, Issue 28.
  Wednesday, May 12, 2010
 
Aboriginal Gathering on Diabetes
Hon. Lillian Eva Dyck: Honourable senators, on Thursday, May 6, 2010, I had the honour and privilege of attending the seventh annual Aboriginal Gathering on Diabetes in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan and to give the keynote address.

These annual Aboriginal gatherings allow us to carefully examine the issue of diabetes in Aboriginal communities today: our struggles and our successes.

Diabetes affects the Aboriginal population in higher numbers than the non-Aboriginal population. The picture is staggering. Aboriginal Canadians are three to five times more likely to develop diabetes than non-Aboriginal Canadians. Aboriginal Canadians are developing diabetes at younger ages and Aboriginal women are four times more likely to develop diabetes than non-Aboriginal women. Diabetes is a very real health concern, and the numbers are growing. With current rates of diabetes among Aboriginals, the future projections of this epidemic are unacceptable. We must make serious efforts to combat this rate of diabetes in our Aboriginal communities.

I was pleased to announce the agreement between Cameco and the Canadian Diabetes Association, North Saskatchewan Region, to further expand the Travelling Diabetes Resource Program at the Aboriginal gathering. Cameco has graciously agreed to provide the Canadian Diabetes Association, North Saskatchewan Region, with a van for the region's Travelling Diabetes Resource Program. The addition of this van will allow the program to serve not only Prince Albert but also many Aboriginal Canadians in most regions of Saskatchewan in an effort to provide a healthier future for Canada's Aboriginal populations.